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Morning Joe

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

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03:00:00

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mpeg2video

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TOPIC FREQUENCY

Chuck Hagel 33, Washington 26, Us 26, Hagel 25, Mika 24, Joe 14, Afghanistan 12, John Mccain 12, Chicago 10, Donny Deutsch 10, Bradley Cooper 8, America 8, U.s. 7, Pentagon 7, D.c. 7, New York City 7, Israel 7, New York 7, Andrea Mitchell 7, Bradley 7,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers  
   and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.  

    February 1, 2013
    6:00 - 9:00am EST  

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doing the corona lime flips. i'm partial to citrus. the best way to drink a corona, give it to a and get a craft b actually tastes good. >> insulting my midsummer drink, nothing better than a corona. great show. "morning joe" starts right now. well, i said it, and i don't remember the context or when i said it. if i had an opportunity to edit that, like many things i've said, i would like to go back and change the words in the meeting. i think in a larger context, i've said many, many things over many years. i have already stated that i regret the terminology. what i meant to say, should have said, it's recognizable. it's been recognized, is recognized that the united nations. that's what i should have said, and thank you.
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>> donny deutsch, how would you like to be secretary of defense? >> well, i certainly -- >> richard haass? >> job interview would show up maybe a little more prepared. >> a little more prepared. >> okay, wait a minute. seriously. you are going to come out of that sound bite and say that? >> about what? >> regretting using certain words and phrases? good morning, everybody. f-bomb. it's friday. >> boom! >> good morning. >> february 1st. what? i'm serious. >> that's all you have? >> no. >> okay. >> no, i got more. >> let's roll some more tape. >> with us on set, he have with the president of the council on foreign relations, richard haass. the chairman of deutsche incorporated, donny deutsch. really? like the king of regretting statements. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell, thank god. >> good morning. >> richard, that was something. >> my last confirmation hearing,
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i was told this hearing is not to show how smart you are or how dumb they are. it's to get you confirmed. at the end of the day, i'm not sure how many votes that changed. it's going to be increasingly a party-line vote. but it was not a strong performance. it won't help him get confirmed, and quite honestly, it will make his job of being secretary of defense i think a little more difficult if and when he gets there. >> andrea, we like chuck hagel. i think he'd be a good secretary of defense, but the performance yesterday was panned by people on all sides of the political spectrum. >> as claire mccaskill told me yesterday, she said, look. he is more used to asking questions than answering questions. there were a lot of issues. and what didn't help, of course, is that his former good friend, john mccain, just eviscerated him, grilled him, didn't give him a chance. yes or no. give me an answer. were you correct or incorrect? i mean, there is a way to try to do that, but clearly he came
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with a very hostile attitude. and it was very painful to watch. >> yeah. awkward at times. >> i mean, john mccain, mika, didn't let him answer a question. i'm sorry, out of that exchange, it was not chuck hagel who looked bad. >> ted cruz looked even worse. >> yeah. >> oh, my god. >> we're going to show all those coming up. >> he wasn't prepared, mika, in a lot of ways that were concerning. i think, again, the democrats, republicans, independents alike, if the republicans party thinks badgering an ill-prepared witness that way is going to help them with middle america, they don't know middle america. they could have just let him talk around in circles, but it was -- you know, you talk about the new senator from texas, john mccain -- >> i agree with you. >> as joe manchin said, it was
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embarrassing. >> compare it to a week ago, to a very prepared hillary clinton. whether badgering prepared or unprepared, badgering is not the way to go. >> having said that, the reviews are in. and they're pretty bad. >> horrible. >> senator marco -- well, some of them are partisan, but there are also we'll get to as well. the response to yesterday' hearing was not good. senator rubio said he cannot support his confirmation. while senator lindsey graham said he's very reluctant to do so. and john barrasso called his performance weak and wobbly. >> john barrasso, mika, had concerns about chuck hagel before. i thought he was very respectful. i think the statements respectful. guys like barrasso, john thune, you know, a lot of republicans would do very well to look at these leaders and emulate them. because those are the type of republicans that are very
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conservative, andrea mitchell, but can also respectful. >> marco rubio put out his statement before the hearing got very far. most people would wait until after the hearing was over. it was eight hours. that was painful. the kinds of unpreparedness and mistakes, and aye been told from the highest level that he had been waterboarded. he had practiced at the pentagon. he had been working on this. but when he referred to containment on iran rather than prevention of nuclear weapons and had to be corrected and then corrected again, a note was passed to him, and then the chairman helpfully said to him, containment is not a policy at all. that is not our policy. that is such a critical mistake on an issue that he knew that he was going to be asked about. we knew that he was going to have to explain the, quote, jewish lobby and take that back and some of the other things. the way he did it didn't seem crisp. and then when ted cruz wheeled
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in the tv screen to play an al jazeera talk show and put him on the spot or how he defended israel or didn't defend israel in response to a question on a talk show, it would be like somebody saying to you or mika, joe, you were on c-span ten years ago, and what did you say to someone who called in? that was very, very tough. >> that was sort of my point at the top. >> it's interesting that you had said, mika, yesterday as we were going to a meeting, we went past hagel probably five minutes in. you just saw the picture of him on the screen. no sound. and you said god, he looks awful. what's wrong with him? >> well, it kind of looked like he had been up all night. i think, again, the reviews kind of crystallized what his demeanor seemed like, which has nothing to do with his ability to do the job. "the new york times" said he was disappointing unsure of himself. "the washington post" said he
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was sinking himself. and the most heated exchange of the day came from a former close friend, senator john mccain who grilled hagel on opposing the 2007 u.s. troop surge in iraq. take a look at that. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> answer the question, senator hagel. the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like you to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things today. >> the records show that you refuse to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give
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you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. as i've already said, my answer is i'll defer that judgment to history. >> i think history has already made a judgment about the surge, sir, and you're on the wrong side of it. >> willie, that actually went on much longer. >> it was awkward. >> than that, and it was badgering. it sort of reminded me of when you see these stupid presidential debates and they go, raise your hands. yes or no. it's just not that simple. >> i think chuck hagel's overarching theme was that the iraq war was a disaster. so he didn't want to give credit for any part of it being a success including the surge. i thought it was noteworthy how little afghanistan was talked about. it's a hot war where we have 66,000 troops over there right now. not just there weren't a lot of questions about it, but when he was asked about it, chuck hagel, he said, i don't have enough information right now to make an informed decision about what the ideal number of troops would be to leave there for the next year or after 2014. i thought that was a little
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strange that a, it didn't come up, and b, he didn't have a clear view of what we should do going forward in afghanistan. i don't know whether that's him being uninformed, unprepared or if he was just being protective and not giving them anything to jump on. >> who prepared this guy? >> actually, he was prepared by people at the pentagon and some of it he actually did in preparation together with john kerry. there actually was some joint boards. can i say one thing about the surge? the thing john mccain was pressing him on. there's a big debate on that. yes, things got better. there's a big debate as opposed to payments by the cia in anbar province. there's a big debate about what actually made a difference. and hagel was saying, look, even if this thing made things better tactically, strategically, it still didn't make sense because the larger thrust of the war didn't make sense. you understand why he was resisting answering that. we can argue about whether it was the best way politically, but substantively, it was an impossible question to answer.
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>> donny, he should have been more confident in why he was resisting to answer that because as richard pointed out, there's a clear discussion about that. >> it's very easy to say a bad performance, that was serious what happened yesterday. there was a level of incompetency across the board, whether it was preparation, whether it was demeanor, whether it was just understanding of facts and policy, and like i said earlier, i'm going to liken it to a job interview. if you go on an interview like that and you perform, you don't get the job. i think this is such a critical appointment. you have to look at that -- >> should he not get the job, you think? >> i think you can't not give him the job based on that, but you also can't dismiss it. there were some very serious things that happened yesterday. >> his comments referring to a jewish lobby who he suggested intimidated people on capitol hill. >> do you still believe that
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their success in this town is because of intimidation? >> i regret referencing the jewish lobby. i should have said pro-israel lobby. that i should have used another term, and i'm sorry. and i regret it. on the use of intimidation, i should have used influence. i think would have been more appropriate. >> name one person in your opinion who's intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person -- >> name one dumb thing we've been goaded into doing because of the pressure from the israeli or jewish lobby. >> i have already stated that i regret the terminology used. >> you said back then, it makes us do dumb things. >> well, i can't give you an example. >> thank you. >> andrea mitchell, obviously
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such a balancing act of a topic. what do you make of the questioning and the answers? >> well, first of all, i think, you know, remember when lloyd bentsen had breakfast with some lobbyists and there was a big brouhaha when he was about to become treasury secretary, he said when i make a mistake, it's a beaut. and it went away. i also think if i would have been prepping him, i wouldn't have let him, in his response, refer to the, quote, jewish lobby because that creates another sound bite. don't do that. just say i know there's some controversy about what i said, and i never should have said that, let's move on, and then turn the corner to the fact that iran is now -- iran, just in the last 24 hours, announced that they are upgrading their centrifuges to produce more enriched uranium. turn it to that, and say but
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let's talk about the real issue which is iran and the threat that iran poses and get on the record on that. >> i'm always struck, donny deutsch, in high-stakes hearings like this when somebody falls on their face, and in large part chuck hagel's situation here, because they were ill prepared. how easy would it have been -- i'll just say it -- for you or me to sit down with him and say, listen, here's the deal, chuck. you said a lot of really, really stupid things. you shoot from the ship all the time. you've said a lot of really, really dumb things. this is what we're going to say when they bring up another stupid thing. you quickly apologize, and then you say, thank goodness i'm not going to have to worry about that moving forward. but i'm going to have to worry about bigger things. i'm going to have to worry about iran. the fact that we have to stop them from getting nuclear weapons. i'm going to have to worry about afghanistan and answer these questions with the administration in consultation with the top generals and admirals. there's so many pat answers that
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you could give that say, listen, guys. i said a lot of really stupid things. and i know none of you, as public figures, have ever made any mistakes like that before. sort of joking about it. and then you move on. but he didn't do that. and part of the problem was -- >> made it worse. >> -- it wasn't just substance. and he was weak on the substance. on a lot of weapons systems. he made it worse because they did not prepare him. >> to deflect. >> he had so many unfortunate statements that he said in the past. and they knew that going in. why didn't they handle this better? >> there's a simple strategy called respond and pivot. and the respond is, there really are a half a dozen kind of real stupid things he said in the past. and we all have. so you can always say, hey, look, that was ten years ago, and i've learned since then. oh, boy, that's not the first or last stupid thing i'll say, and have the pivot ready. because it was very specific. and there were really five or six areas to go, and that's it. so i don't have an answer to it. and it's a simple, simple
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strategy that he did not execute. >> we'll continue in just a moment. we have some breaking news. a spokesman tells the associated press ed koch, the outspoken three-term mayor of new york city, has died at the age of 88. the cause of death was congestive heart failure, and that's just coming into us now. andrea, i hear you sighing. >> well, you know, how many i doing? how many i doing? the campaign. he was so controversial. and then, of course, when barack obama was running, he was very not just controversial, but he went over, some said, over the edge and became really alienated from a lot of the leaders. there's no denying the force that he was in new york city. and the remarkable character that he was. >> absolutely. >> all those years. >> he was, donny, the face of new york for so long. >> he is. i grew up in the city. and i love him. and i actually think his way was
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an early, early precursor to probably the most, if not hillary clinton, loved politician today, chris christie, straight talking, who he is, the embodiment of a region, unapologetically, and obviously stylistically very different but kind of built from the same mold. he was one of the greatest. >> he was another of the generation of these guys, these leaders, that we're losing now to who served in world war ii, was drafted in 1943, landed on a beach in france in 1944, you know, by the time he was 20 something years old and then went on to do all these great things. and he was still, until the end, a fighter. he was smart. he was funny. he'd come on msnbc and get into charming -- if aggressive fights over questions. >> you put that in quotes. >> about new york. he was the mayor of the city at a difficult time, too, donny. new york was not a pretty face when he came into office in 1978. >> a very difficult time. some of new york's toughest times. >> absolutely.
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remember things in the mid-'70s with the ford administration, the sense that new york was on its own and was going down. koch became the physically and political embodiment of new york's revival. as a politician, i don't think he paid a lot of money for pollsters. i don't think he did a lot of testing of the sound bites before he said them. and you've got to love that. he was just out there. >> yeah. a couple of other news stories we have going on this morning at 8:30, we'll be covering this live. the labor department will release its first jobs report of the year, which is expected to show the economy largely unchanged from the last month of 2012. unemployment rate still at 7.8%. >> and we're going to hear -- the president's jobs council. >> exactly. >> will weigh in. >> i was just getting to that. >> this report is critical. >> okay. >> you need a jobs council. >> fine. they're getting rid of it. >> a lot of times i'm critical of this administration, but i think -- i think putting together jobs, willie, what did i say? this jobs council thing. he's got it right.
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this is going to be big. >> they're all going to be on, too, today. in their robes, they're going to come on and break down the numbers. >> i love it. >> new collaborations with businesses are going to be announced soon. >> the jobs council is? >> no, that's going away. they're getting rid of it. >> what? >> they wear helmets, the job council. >> stop it. >> you mean the guys on the jobs council have lost their jobs? >> yeah. >> this has not turned out how i expected. oh, my lord! >> all right. >> what else we got going? bradley's going to be here. >> bradley's going to be on the show. yes, he's coming back. well, his movie, "silver linings playbook," do you love that movie? >> in fact, i love it had so much when he was on the show last time, joe, you accused me of being a kiss ass. >> no, it's a good movie. there's good news for him. he'll never have to do another "hangover" again. forget it. he's done. he doesn't need to. >> you've seen them how many
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times? >> i walked out of one of them. he never has to do that stuff again. he's broken through. still ahead, oscar-nominated actor bradley cooper is with us. also, reverend jesse jackson on his organization's meetings this week on wall street. we'll also be asking him about the continuing murders in chicago. his hometown. they do not stop. also, member of the senate armed services committee, senator richard blumenthal. he had a front-row seat at whatever that was yesterday we were just looking at. we'll talk to him about chuck hagel and whether he's closer or further away from supporting him. also, "the washington post's" bob woodward will be here. and up next, cory booker is likely to be eyeing a run for senator, but frank lautenberg, man, he's going after booker. >> interesting. >> pretty tough. we'll be talking about that, too. first, let's go right now to bill karins. >> oh, lord. >> he's got the weather. >> ratings are going to plummet. bill. >> washington, d.c., overnight
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was expecting some snow showers and some flurries. oops. it's snowing. already an inch or two on the ground in some areas of maryland. and it's snowing hard from around annapolis across the chesapeake, and as you go into maryland and now delaware it's snowing good, too. it's moving out in a hurry. d.c., you'll see the flakes ending in probably the next half hour. if you're driving in southern new jersey, delaware or over across the chesapeake in maryland, it's going to be a slippery morning for you. talk about cold. i mean, it's a brutal morning. it was bad yesterday in north dakota. now it has spread through all of minnesota, iowa. look at waterloo at minus 25. the windy city, chicago, windchill is minus 17. cold air is in place. and as we go through the next five days, we're going to have a lot of what we call weak little snowstorms that will move from the ohio valley to the northeast. they're going to start up there in canada. alberta clippers. treat why they're called, they start up in alberta. for the weekend, we get rid of the snow early around d.c. pretty cold, quiet day around much of the country.
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the exception, watch out in cleveland and syracuse with lake-effect snow. then we track another band of snow saturday. minneapolis, chicago. and then for super bowl sunday, we're going to see some of that snow moving through the mid-atlantic and the northeast. the big cities, the roads should be okay, but the secondary roads could get an inch or two of snow out there as you're going to your super bowl parties. we leave you with a shot of washington, d.c. obviously not snowing very hard. visibility's pretty good, but there's especially some slippery spots across the chesapeake. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ female announcer ] when a woman wears a pad she can't always move the way she wants. now you can. with stayfree ultra thins. flexible layers move with your body while thermocontrol wicks moisture away. keep moving. stayfree. marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing
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24 past the hour. time now to take a look at the "morning papers." "the washington post." the threat of a new government default has been delayed at least for a few months. in a vote yesterday the u.s. senate approved a bill that prevent says the u.s. government from reaching its borrowing limit until may.
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the senate plan which cleared the house last week also requires members of congress to pass a budget by mid-april or risk having their paychecks withheld. willie. from the parade of papers, "the houston chronicle," a truckload of fireworks set off a series of deadly explosions in china collapsing an elevated highway, sending vehicles plummeting 100 feet to the ground. chinese media reported 26 have been killed by the explosion before retracting their report. "the wall street journal," the u.s. justice department has sued to prevent a blockbuster deal of two beermakers, anheuser-busch anbev has sought to acquire groupo modelo. >> inbev and modelo. >> i'm just not a beer person. i don't drink beer. i drink vodka. >> they're against large beers. that's why there was the merger. >> mika, your voice is being heard around the world. >> thank you.
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the merger would give inbev control of 46% of the domestic beer market. "the courier journal," a new stud judge finds being a vegetarian will reduce chances of dying from heart disease. non-meat eaters typically have lower blood and cholesterol levels. they also were thinner and had a lower chance of developing diabetes. >> mika, does this mean can i still have chicken and be a vegetarian, or can i still have fish? >> can i still have steak once a month? >> no. the red meat, man. can you? >> chicken, fish and vegetables, i think you're okay. you're not technically a vegetarian, but you're close enough. >> yeah, semi. >> what if it reduces your chance of dying by 30%, but you're just pissed off all the time? >> right. is it worth living that life? >> there's a balance. "the boston globe," if ticket sales -- >> paul mccartney here to talk about that. you know he's vegetarian. >> right. >> bill clinton.
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>> bill clinton, too. >> he's a vegan. >> after not being one. >> if ticket sales are any indication, it could be a long season for the boston red sox. >> really? >> wow. wish barnicle was here. >> season ticket renewal sales were down 10% from this time last year putting sold-out streak of 793 games in jeopardy. we need to go up there. we need to do a show from there. i love the red sox. i love fenway. >> i hate to break it to you, mika, but -- >> what? i want to go. >> -- we opened the season last year, one of the worst seasons ever in red sox history, on the field. >> i remember. >> to celebrate the 100th anniversa anniversary. >> yes, that was so much fun. that was great. let's do that. >> they asked us not to come back, ever. the curse of the bambino has been replaced by the curse of the brzezinski. we are being asked to stay away from yawkey way. >> you guys went on that big
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buying spree a couple years ago. maybe you want to take a-rod off their hands. >> a-rod? >> not going to help. >> what's in this week's "parade"? >> ahead of the super bowl, a look at the top high school football recruits in the country. >> okay. all right. there you go. >> all right. with us now, chief white house correspondent for "politico" with a look at the "playbook." >> happy friday. >> happy friday to you. help us dig through this menendez story, if you will. we need the latest in the investigation of the florida doctor, also a major backer of new jersey senator bob menendez. there's been a lot of talk. there's a lot going on online. help us cut through it. what's the core of is this story? >> senator menendez is about to become chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. so he's going to be one of the most prominent senators. and he hasn't been able to answer questions that went back to his re-election campaign and that have now been revived about trips to the dominican republic where supposedly there was some interaction with prostitutes. now, this came back because the
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flights were taken on a plane by a west palm beach doctor who was raided this week by the fbi, never good when you're about to become a committee chairman. he's a big donor. now, senator menendez's office has said that they paid back, out of personal funds, some of those flights. and so they hope that that's going to get them off the hook. but senator menendez is acting like there's a lot more to this. surprisingly, he didn't show up in the senate chamber for the farewell speech by senator john kerry who he's going to succeed as chairman of that committee. reporters from his home state outside of his office were stood up all day. now, last night he showed up at a dinner here in washington, a big annual dinner by the new jersey chamber of commerce. and surprisingly, he didn't talk about prostitutes or flights or fbi raids. he talked about transportation and sandy aid, not exactly what people were curious about. and a big pack of reporters
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followed him out. he didn't answer any questions there. by the way, also speaking at that dinner, governor chris christie who brought down the house by saying -- starting out his speech by saying, "washington, d.c., my kind of town. i love it here." >> mike, there's also a report in "the miami herald" that senator menendez did use his influence to steer business toward this doctor in the dominican republic. the part about the prostitutes getting a lot of attention. is there any sub stan shags for that? >> this started, willie, on conservative websites during his re-election campaign. senator menendez vigorously denied it. but as we're seeing with this story that popped up today, very close connections with this donor. and just writing a check to take care of some flights that happened back in 2010. and you wrote the check in january when these stories have been around for months and months? that's going to prolong these
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questions at a time that there's even more of a spotlight coming onto senator menendez. >> more reporting on this to come. let's keep it in jersey now. newark mayor, likely senate candidate, cory booker, absent in washington last night from the dinner you talked about. senator frank lautenberg took a jab at booker, reportedly saying, quote, i thought traveling out of the city was one of his favorite activities: perhaps we're too close to newark. >> oh, my goodness. >> lautenberg has indicated he is not going to give his seat up easily. a few weeks ago there was a senior aide that told you guys at "politico" that cory booker was self-absorbed, that he's disrespectful. senator lautenberg came out not long ago and said when one of his children behaved like cory booker is may habehaving, he wo often give them a spanking. what's going on here? >> that's rough. >> that is awkward. >> mike, what's going on? >> as you know, these dinners in washington are usually pretty boring. this new jersey chamber of
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commerce dinner last night turned out to be pretty lively. now, senator lautenberg's 88. people around washington sort of think he's not going to run again. but i think there's pride here. he doesn't want to be pushed out. and the big thing is he doesn't want cory booker to assume that he's not going to run. and that has been the spirit of a lot of these statements. senator lautenberg fighting back and showing here that he still has a few tricks up his sleeve for the youngster from newark. >> frank lautenberg's not going to be bumped aside. one more new jersey story. can you believe this? >> why not? this is a good one. >> "politico" statement. >> the big "d." into the bog. >> absolutely, we're keeping it in bergen county, hudson county, wherever you want to go. geraldo rivera, we're hearing now, wants to hop into the new jersey senate race. >> of course. >> and some of our fine producers downstairs have kindly put together a compilation of what you might expect from senator rivera. >> please have al capone's.
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>> he has the taliban spokesman on the line. ask how he feels about getting his [ bleep ] kicked. >> sanctuary cities, what do you think? >> i think you have the story almost exactly wrong, my friend. i think we're talking about drunk driving. i hi the hoodie is as much responsible for trayvon martin's death as george zimmerman was. it could be a jewish drunk, it could be a polish drunk, it could be an irish drunk, an italian drunk. what the hell difference does it make -- >> it makes plenty of difference. >> the state department, the cia, does nothing, sends no help. >> it's an absolute misrepresentation. you are a politician needing to make a political point. >> that's a cheap political point and you know it. >> this is justice. >> this has nothing to do with being mayor. >> he's going to fight for the people of new jersey is what we're saying. >> just like that. >> western civilization is in trouble. come on. come on. really. >> seriously. >> really.
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come on. >> what we didn't show you there was al capone's vault, 1986, a great day for the country. >> great television. great television. >> that was one of the great moments. >> this is why james madison created a senate, so we could have this? >> this is the cooling saucer. you can see why senator rivera -- >> did you just call him senator rivera? >> would-be senator rivera said on his radio show when he announced that he talked seriously to politicians in new jersey about running, he said, buckle your seat belt. >> wow. >> that will make things better. >> did you get tickets to that new jersey chamber of commerce dinner next year? that seems to be the place to be. >> i think they're on stubhub. >> this has been good morning, trenton. thank you for joining us. mike allen, thanks so much. >> chopper 12 ready to go. >> thank you, mike. coming up, beyonce makes a surprise appearance during yesterday's super bowl press conference, answering the question, did she or didn't she lip-sync at the inauguration?
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[ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. welcome back to "morning joe." a live picture of the superdome, just two days away from the
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super bowl. looking pretty good down there in new orleans at 5:38 in the morning. 6:38 here in new york city. were you watching mickelson? >> watched the highlights. >> unbelievable. he had a chance to break the single-day scoring record which would have been a 58. he blazed through the first round of the phoenix open with 11 birdies through the first 17 holes. so if he birdied the final two holes, he could have had a 58. this is him on 17. oh. so he had to tap in for par. but if he could birdie 18, he still would shoot a 59, becoming only the sixth man in pga history to shoot a score that low. there's the putt on 18 for 59. >> oh, no! oh, my goodness! have you ever seen a crueller lip-out than that?
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>> that was the call on the golf channel yesterday. so two putts that really could have gone down. clearly he thought he had that on 18. that would have given him a 59. his reaction was classy. his caddie, bones, in the background fell to his knees in disbelief. >> oh, my lord! >> look at that. hard to say he settled for it, but he settled for a 60. he probably thinks he should have had the 58 which would have been the record. >> he's been talking about leaving golf because of high tax rates. if he'd have shot a 58, it would have given him a reason to leave golf, so we're going to keep him around. >> i've got to say, i was watching soccer. >> really? who was playing? >> no. >> richard got a 58. >> exactly. so we all know the beyonce story by now, right? she had the backing track at the inauguration last week. she finally got around to answering questions about it because, frankly, we haven't heard from her personally. this is at a news conference at the super bowl down in new
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orleans. she let her singing mostly do the talking. ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave ♪ the brave any questions? due to the weather, due to the delay, due to no proper sound check, i did not feel comfortable taking a risk. it was about the president and the inauguration, and i wanted to make him and my country proud. so i decided to sing along with my prerecorded track, which is very common in the music industry. and i'm very proud of my performance. >> so just to go back for a minute, she walked out for this
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press conference. they thought it was going to be a q&a. she asked everybody to stand up. they put the flag on the monitor behind her and belts out and then said, "any questions? i >> you think she was a little pitchy? >> what are you, simon cowell? >> no, i'm saying what you were saying off the air. >> she's beyonce. >> her talent is great. i don't think anybody questions whether she can sing. i still stand by, the inauguration, make it real. >> tear out the earpiece, come on. i will say, we have learned now, you go back and you dig bag through history, we find out that robert frost was faking it back in '60. he actually could read the poem, but he was, like, doing this. just for dramatic effect. >> what was she -- she's proud of her performance of acting. >> yes, that's exactly what it is. losing authenticity, kids.
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>> the problem is kelly clarkson did the whole thing live. that lost that argument. >> james taylor also. >> this was very sweet. >> beyonce confirmed she will be singing live at halftime on sunday. >> now, is it true -- >> but the game -- >> uh-oh. >> isn't it true that whitney houston also lip-synced at the super bowl? >> the famous one. >> yeah. this all came out -- >> 1991. >> it was unbelievable. she was lip-syncing the whole thing. >> nothing is sacred. >> nothing is sacred. >> did the beatles really sing on "ed sullivan"? >> who knows? >> i think there needs to be a disclaimer. when you go to see a performance, you go to see someone singing live womaning out of their mouth. this is ridiculous. let's lip-sync the whole show. are you kidding me? it's not okay. >> you stay at home and listen to your ipod. >> that didn't make it okay, her going and singing pitchy at a press conference and saying any questions? >> she had a backing track.
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she was singing. she wasn't securely lip-syncing. her voice was coming through. >> that's not what it would have sounded like had she sung live. >> she's not milli vanilli. i don't think we're disputing that she could sing. she just had a bad moment. >> back off milli vanilli, okay? >> i knew milli vanilli. >> why is there this discussion? >> 1989, man, what a year. >> this is stupid. >> blame it on the rain. >> what's next? "the financial times'" gillian tett and the reverend jesse jackson. twins. i didn't see them coming.
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all right. a snowy look at the white house in washington, d.c. the storm we're contending with this morning. at 47 past the hour, here with us now, assistant editor and columnist for "the financial times," gillian tett back with us, good to see you. and founder of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. good to have you on board. he brought us some fresh numbers. >> you're talking about money that u.s. corporations are taking overseas. your push right now is getting it back home. >> with the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and trying to get bipartisan, but over here is something called poverty, 50 million americans and racial disparity and cities collapsing and the like. i'm going to make the case we should build america an urban infrastructural bank for the purpose of long-term loans. we do it in europe and japan. and no other country charges
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people to repatriate their money once they pay taxes in that country. but we do. but if we, in fact, took a portion of that money, part for research and development and part of it for an institutional bank, you could do what banks are not doing, and that's invest in these downtrodden areas of our country. >> gillian, we've been talking about it for years, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines not coming back to america. how do we get it back here? >> almost $2 trillion. you've got average household earnings down over the past four years, poverty is up. we need this money working in our economy. how do we get it here? >> absolutely. i think the reverend's idea is very interesting because right now many of the companies are on the list he's got showing the companies that have their money stashed overseas are very aware that this looks very bad politically. their responsibility, their departments want to find a way to look as if they're part of an effort to rebuild america and tackle issues like poverty. politically it's probably quite
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clever. and it's worth bearing in mind, you were talking about ed koch and his time as mayor and bringing people out of that crisis by getting companies to work with unions, and it's worth remembering that pension funds actually bought city bonds to try and be part of a joint effort to pull together and boost growth. essentially what the reverend is talking about is trying to revive that spirit of pulling together. >> skyscrapers, airlines, shopping centers. propped up south africa until we disinvested. frankly, the use of pension funds plus this offshore money does not go back to congress -- to the congressional dole again. while they're debating, as i said, the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling, that does not address this vast area of the impact of foreclosed homes. because when you foreclose 100,000 homes in chicago and detroit and people leave, then the local cleaners, the local
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laundry, the local servicer, the foreclosures drove poverty. the banks got built out. but the people who got drove out are living in poverty and sometimes violence. >> we want to turn in our final moments here to chicago. and gun control, especially pertaining to the crisis in that city. and one case that just -- if it doesn't crystallize exactly what we're talking about, i don't know what does. and that is the young girl who was performing -- >> little miss pendleton. >> yeah. >> rainbow push and reverend sharpton and others, we're going to march this weekend to where she was killed. her mother was on "politics nation" last night. it's a little more complicated. there are no gun shops in chicago, joe. they make guns in barrington and rock island, so guns are in.
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if you know where guns are manufactured and the trail where they're sold, you'd break up the trail. you see the flow of gun manufacturing, gun shops which turns into -- then drugs are coming in. several drug cartels. guns and drugs and jobs out for perhaps unemployment. that's an urban crisis. it's different than the analysis, say, of sandy hook which is a different arrangement, mostly employed people, loss of gun shop, higher than chicago, it's a very different deal. >> how do you answer, reverend jackson, the argument that you have some of the toughest gun laws in the country, handguns were banned completely until two or three years ago, and yet we still have this epidemic? more than 40 people killed by guns already. i just looked at "the chicago tribune" website. two hours ago a woman was found shot to death in a van on an off-ramp on lake shore drive. how do you answer the fact,
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you've already got tough gun laws and yet all this violence? >> it's not just about gun laws, it's gun flow and job flow. we know where they're manufactured. and you cannot stop them. rahm is doing a tremendous job, i think, trying to maneuver police. he's in this box, guns coming in. and when the plants close and the jobs leave, so poverty and drugs and guns and race are factors. if this were the north side of town, it would be a different arrangement. even there, i might add. >> what do you mean by that? >> there's a kind of grouping in difference on racial basis. last year 506 were killed, 175 under age 18. all we could get was the people are at fault. in sandy hook, the gunman was at fault. kind of two ways of looking at the same situation. this has been a growing problem for a long time. and chief mccarthy is recovering guns at a faster rate than l.a. we are setting up for an international drug war.
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we need homeland security because these guns have the power to shoot down airplanes, not just theaters and classrooms. they have the power to shoot down airplanes. they can blow up railroads. these terrorists have the power to destroy in a bigger way than they have done already. >> it's frightening. >> reverend jesse jackson, great to have you on the show. gillian, stay with us if you can. >> you know what he says? >> what? >> he says he watches the show every morning. >> that's nice. >> thank you. >> because you provide the substance. >> the style. >> i provide the style. nobody's ever accused me of that before. thank you, senator. thanks a lot. senator richard blumenthal of connecticut's going to be here talking about chuck hagel's difficulties yesterday, also "the washington post's" eugene robinson. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] i've seen incredible things.
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standing by in the green room, senator richard blumenthal is here to give us his take on chuck hagel's testimony yesterday. and up next, nbc's chuck todd joins the conversation. also, award-winning journalist bob woodward and former bush administration foreign policy adviser, dan senor. >> oh, my gosh. >> back in a moment. [ manager 1 ] out here in the winds,
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a live look at the capitol and a snowy washington, d.c. it is the top of the hour. time to get moving this morning. welcome back to "morning joe." donny deutsch and gillian tett are still with us. msnbc contributor mike barnicle joins us on set. with us from washington, nbc news chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown," chuck todd and former policy adviser to the bush administration, dan senor. >> he's going to be insufficiere
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today. i've got to say, mike barnicle, there were women looking for you last night at the relief for rockaway event in new york city. i don't know what fund-raiser you were at, but they hosted that one, and they all wanted you. >> huge in rockaway. >> i have alibis for everything that they charged me with last night. >> really? oh, good. >> it was amazing. we were getting accosted. where's barnicle? where's barnicle? >> that was a great event last night. >> relief for rockaway. check out the website. >> some amazing stuff. and still, the pain and suffering that those people are still dealing with, mika, just unbelievable. you know, the cameras have left, the suffering continues. they need all the help they can get. >> we tweeted out a video taken recently. this one as well as a few others. just if you need to get a sense of why you might want to help a little bit. also, we do have breaking news. just this morning, we learned
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longtime new york city mayor ed koch has died. he had been in and out of the hospital recently. and last night was admitted into the intensive care unit. koch was known for his sharp tongue, sparring with everyone from donald trump to rudy giuliani. he even made the head of the city council cry. in his autobiography, he wrote, i'm not the type to get ulcers, i give them. he lifted the city out of a shortfall while still managing to improve subway service. at times the longtime democrat broke party rank, backing george w. bush for president in 2004. koch died of congestive heart failure. he was 88 years old. funeral services are scheduled for monday. >> briefly, mike barnicle, an original. >> an original, yeah. >> timing is everything. his timing to be mayor of new york city, not so great. he took it over at one of the worst times. but he did as good as anybody could do. >> yeah. >> in that situation.
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>> i think in retrospect, the city was well served by him taking over. he took over, basically being an accountant who became mayor, didn't have his hands on the tools of government. ed koch comes in with his personality and the approach that he had to politics. everyone knew him. he rode the subway. he knew people in every borough. people got the feeling finally, after the bean years, that someone was in charge, and you're right, joe. and i heard gillian talking about it earlier. the pension troubles, the city going bankrupt, ed koch helped revive the city. and the revival occurred, obviously continued through the '90s and bill bratman and rudy giuliani. >> in so many ways, what he did is such an inspiring story for today because he actually did get people to work together. he stood out. he was memorable. he was basically a leader, but he actually got both sides of
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the political spectrum to work together and the unions on board to work with business. and that's something which people need to remember today. >> he had the skills of a great turnaround artist. you know, didn't take prisoners. i remember i was in my late teens in the city when he took over. >> what? >> this was a bleak place. >> late teens. yes, sir, you can look it up. there was a bolt of energy that came with him, like him or not. >> yes, that's a good way to put it. >> he gave people hope. >> one of the greats of all time. in other news, chuck hagel testified before the senate armed services committee yesterday for the job of defense secretary. he was not well received by his former republican colleagues. the most heated exchange came from senator john mccain who grilled hagel on opposing the 2007 u.s. troop surge in iraq. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect?
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yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> are you going to answer the question? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like you to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things today. >> the records show you refuse to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. as i've already said, my answer is i'll defer that judgment to history. >> i think history has already made a judgment about the surge, sir. and you're on the wrong side of it. >> see, that's debatable. but okay. hagel was also repeatedly questioned on his 2008 comments referring to a, quote, jewish lobby who he suggested intimidated people on capitol hill. >> do you still believe that
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their success in this town is because of intimidation? >> i regret referencing the jewish lobby. i should have said pro-israel lobby. that i should have used another term, and i'm sorry. and i regret it. on the use of intimidation, i should have used influence, i think, would have been more appropriate. >> name one person, in your opinion, who's intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> name one dumb thing we've been goaded into doing because of the pressure from the israeli or jewish lobby. >> i have already stated that i regret the terminology used. >> but you said back then, it makes us do dumb things. >> well, i can't give you an
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example. >> thank you. >> bob woodward, you've been around washington for a long time. can you think of a nominee that has fared as poorly, for one of the top positions, attorney general, sec def, secoretary of state, that fared as poorly as chuck hagel did yesterday? >> a very unsteady performance, to say the least. as you know, the key to being secretary of defense, and cheney, when he was secretary of defense, or bob gates, for both bush and obama, to put it in english, you have to be a ball buster. chuck hagel yesterday was the opposite, just unsure of himself on the question of the surge which mccain was pounding him on. mccain has a very strong position, but there is a respectable position to say, wait a minute. the surge wasn't the big magic
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wand that lots of people think it was. i wrote a whole book about it, "the war within," showing that it was top-secret operations. if you can remember the sunni awakening in iraq in 2006, 2007, contributed to the reduction of violence. what was surprising is that hagel didn't have the defense for that very respectable position. >> well, you know, and chuck todd, donny deutsch and i have been talking about it this morning. he just seemed ill prepared. i don't think it's going to change any votes at the end of the day. i think he still passes. but chuck hagel knew, and his handlers knew he had made some very dumb comments in the past, some ill-advised comments, whether he wants to talk about the, quote, jewish lobby or talk about the comments about iran, and he was not prepared
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sufficiently to handle that any more than the president seemed prepared for the first debate. again, at the end of the day, i don't think it's going to really matter, but there are some easy swat-aways that he just screwed up on. >> and not only that, i learned that he did do mock hearings. you know, this wasn't like the first time. he actually -- they did go through this process. none of this was new to him. there wasn't a single question that they didn't expect. and if he was surprised by any question, then he didn't read the book. >> what happened, chuck? what happened? >> you know, that's -- the best explanation i've got from the white house is, hey, that's who he is. he was not going to sit there and have arguments with his former colleagues. he decided to sit there and take it and take the flogging. and the white house, you know, they feel the same way you do, joe. which is this was not good. he'll get confirmed anyway. and they're trying to chalk it up to, you know what? there are a lot of republican
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colleagues of his who are -- who took him switching sides essentially personally. because here you have chuck hagel and john kerry, you know, more sympatico on foreign policy issues than not. john kerry slides through. he got a foreign relations grilling, a little bit different. he glides through, having the same position on the surge, having the same position on some of these things, and hagel gets beaten up and beaten up badly by his former colleagues. is it a case where some republican senators simply just took it personally? >> yeah. it obviously looked, dan senor, very personal when you look at the way that john mccain went after him. not allowing him to answer a question which, as you know better than anybody else, very complicated answer. tactically do people like you and me believe the surge was very effective? yes. but there are differently schools of thoughts about the long-term impact, what caused
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it, whether it was paying off the sunni leaders, whether it was a variety of other things. but mccain kept hammering him, kept badgering him. it seemed awfully personal, didn't it? >> it seemed like they wanted to publicly humiliate him. >> between the announcement and the hearing -- the announcement of senator hagel in the hearing, the white house had been saying this, it's personal, and some of these republicans very much resent chuck hagel. but senators were also told, particularly democratic senators. in fact, i spoke to two senators last night here in washington who said, look, for a month we've been told by the white house, because a number of senators have held back their endorsement of hagel. you see almost a majority of senators still have not said whether they'd vote for him. and what they have been saying is, we're going to wait on the hearing. the hearing's going to be consequential. we're inclined to give the president his prerogative and support his nominee, but obviously there's some tough questions hagel has to answer, and that's what the hearing is for. and the white house had been telling these senators and its surrogates, don't worry. he'll perform at the hearing.
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he'll reassure everyone, and then this will move to an easy vote once we get past the hearing. these two senators last night, one democrat, run republican, said geez, this puts us in an enormously difficult situation because we've been building up this hearing and been told he'll be going on tv like claire mccaskill saying don't worry, he'll perform in the hearing. and then he shows up and is either totally unprepared or not ready for this kind of exchange. and i think that compromises people's confidence. >> dan, do you think anything's going to change from what happened yesterday? >> joe, it really is too early to tell. here's the key question. how much time will there be between this hearing and a vote? there are senators on the committee who are asking for a lot of information. there's still a lot of financial information to come out, a lot of information about past speeches that the committee has asked for that they have not received. so the question is if they say we're going to hold on a vote till we get all this information, and it drags out
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the process, i think there's going to be more analysis on how bad this hearing went. and then i think you can get into uncharted territory. >> mike barnicle. >> bob, you know, we've heard various theorys this morning and all last evening about senator hagel's performance. that's who he is. that's his personality. but just in terms of prepping him for this hearing, why was it -- and you're as inside as anybody could be inside within these stories -- why was it, do you think, that no one had the foresight in the white house to tell senator hagel, don't take a feather duster to a knife fight. >> that's well expressed. well, he was -- he knew he was going to be attacked on some of these earlier votes and positions and comments. he just seemed as if he was so on the defensive. i think the key issue is what's
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the strategy going to be in the white house to just wait this out. and as we well know, the people in the white house are experts at calculating president obama's political interest. and they're going to say, you know, how is this going to go? and they're also experts at looking at the question, and they will relook at it, is chuck hagel the right person for this job? because we may be going into four years of foreign policy and defense dust-ups and serious confrontations. this, arguably, is the most important cabinet appointment. as we learned in the susan rice non-nomination for secretary of state, they're willing in the white house to say, now, wait a minute. this isn't working out. this may not be the right person.
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and take that short-term hit. i think the real issue is how does the white house really look at it? i think now they're just going to wait it out. but time may not be on their side. >> chuck, it's donny. i want to go back to something you said about running the mock hearing. >> yeah. >> he could -- and i'd like to know what the white house's position or response to this is. you literally could have prepped him in seven minutes. there are basically three responses he ought to have on iran, iraq and the jewish lobby. >> and his past stupid statements. >> those are about the three big stupid statements that you literally could have given him a sentence response and a pivot point for each one. how did that -- what would the white house explanation be of how that didn't happen? >> look, the explanation i got on this, because that's what i said. i asked around, i said, did he do mock hearings? and was told yes. and i said, boy, the better answer might have been no. then you could have at least
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explained that, well, he was unprepared. and the only explanation you get from hagel defenders is, this is who he is. he's kind of professorial. we did a little word count. mika, you're going to like this. the number of times afghanistan was brought up at the hearing, 38. the number of times israel was brought up, 178. >> yeah. there you go. >> there were not a lot of serious questions. and i'm not saying that iran issue is not a serious question. that's a serious question that the next secretary of defense is going to have to deal with. but the fact that there was so little conversation, so little questioning about afghanistan, what's the troop level should look like, his vision going forward, those sort of things. that was disappointing. and the second thing -- and joe, i'm sure this is going to drive you nuts -- how many senators on both sides, they get in their tough questions, and then they say, let me ask you about this defense contracting thing that's in my state. you're not going to ever get rid of it, are you? it was sort of like, well, and you wonder why we can't deal
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with the budget. >> it's unbelievable. and by the way, there's a way to ask chuck hagel tough questions. we showed clips of roger wicker who is very conservative but very respectful. and then you see -- and i don't even want to mention his name, the new senator from texas who your honor turned it into a clown show and other senators who were playing for the cameras and are trying to get a headline. >> and played the issue that chuck mentioned when you look at what was mentioned more than the actual current war in afghanistan, which i would love to hear lots of questions and answers about our direction there for the men and women who are serving and quite frankly suffering from repeat tours of duties. gillian. >> absolutely, mika. afghanistan simply was not discussed enough. but another very basic issue that was not discussed enough was the military budget. we've just had figures showing that gdp, seriously, underperformed partly because of defense cutbacks. and we didn't really hear his
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views about what he wants to do in terms of trying to preserve american military might and actually get real about budget cuts. >> nor did we hear which, of course, that's really the most important thing because it affects everything we do across the world. it affects our global footprint. also, mike barnicle, the cover of "time" magazine this week couldn't be any more timely, drones and the future of drones at the department of defense as we go around and continue to drop bombs on countries where we haven't declared war. we continue to kill civilians who are not engaged in the war on terror. and we continue to cause what some people would call, quote, collateral damage, which is actually not only the killing of innocents, but also actually the ensnarling of the united states in lifetime conflicts across the world. >> you know, in my unofficial word count, drones, in chuck's tabulation might bear this out, drones were not mentioned once. and it ties into the defense budget. >> not once, that's right. not once. >> unbelievable. >> we are now -- we just saw it
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in the news yesterday or the day before, establishing a base in north africa or within africa specifically for the use of drones, for surveillance purposes and then onward with drones. not one mention of this. and that is the coming technological warfare that we are going to be most involved with. >> absolutely. data recently suggesting that within ten years, about one-third of the u.s. machines, vehicles, et cetera will essentially be unmanned. now, that's a significant technological shift right now that that's going on that needs to be debated. >> mika, not a real conversation about drones. >> no. >> not a real conversation about the size of the defense budget from these people attacking -- >> no. >> -- chuck hagel. >> republicans. >> again we have a big spectacle of what somebody on a call-in television show said years ago. seriously, send in the clowns. >> yeah. >> there's a certain senator that should just have judy collins following him around the capitol all the time.
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and she can just -- we'll give her a mr. microphone, and she can just walk behind him. >> joe, think about how hard it is to deal with follow-up questions from donny deutsch. if we had to, like, say donny, no, no, no, we've got to take issue with that, we'd be here all day, right? >> chuck, you're just mad because i made fun of you. >> i love you, donny. >> look beyond this a little bit and kind of ask the question, who is chuck hagel, he's kind of a defense intellectual. and you could see that he's weighing everything in his mind and so forth. maybe the confirmation process on television as theater is the wrong forum to assess who he is. >> i think it is, bob. i think it is. i think there are a lot of questions that need to be raised about chuck hagel, his preparedness. we're just saying the hearing
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wasn't handled well. there are a lot of people -- and bob, i know that you'll remember this name very well. who have come up to me quietly who support chuck hagel and have said, is this going to be our century's version of les aspen? >> that's the recollection i had. les aspen, the pinnacle of defense intellectuals and just deny work out in the pentagon and was very hesitant to make decisions. in the pentagon, secretary of defense, i think you get to make 100 decisions a day on the average, and you want to weigh them, but you don't want to overweigh them. and that's kind of the mindset. it's going to be most interesting to see, as i was saying, how the white house is going to deal with this because it's a real issue not just
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because of the theater and the performance but the question, what sort of secretary of defense do you need now? >> and that's, of course, mika, the most important question that needs to be asked, and a lot of questions were raised yesterday. >> i think chuck's point about what the questions were and how many were about one thing versus another ought to be looked at by people before they judge hagel too harshly. the most theatrical way. yeah? >> this hearing would be unmemorable but for chuck hagel's answers. no one would be talking about the questions had his performance not been so weak. >> check out the questions. check out ted cruz and senator mccain. >> chuck, we're going to see you on "the daily rundown" right after "morning joe." dan senor, we'll see you on "senor nation," right? when does that show start? >> people for the senor way. >> people for the senor way which they are now proposing a full-scale invasion of canada sometime next week. still ahead, oscar
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nominee -- >> bob woodward, thank you so much. >> -- bradley cooper joins us next. he did a really good movie. he doesn't have to do "hangover" anymore. >> but he wants to. >> he has broken through, baby. democratic senator from connecticut, senator richard blumenthal joins us. also eugene robinson. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected.
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home alone with her baby, she called 911 when two violent intruders began to break down her front door. ms. mckinley fired her weapon, fatally wounding one of the violent attackers. the other fled. the peace of mind that a woman has as she's facing three, four, five violent attackers, intruders, in her home with her children screaming in the background. the peace of mind that she has,
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knowing that she has a scary looking gun gives her more courage when she's fighting hardened violent criminals. >> when did it turn into three and four and five? jesus! where does she live, the alamo? what are you talking about? >> yeah. i wondered that myself. joining us now, democratic senator from connecticut and member of the senate armed services committee, senator richard blumenthal. and in washington, pulitzer prize-winning columnist, eugene robinson. good to have you all on board. >> you were there yesterday. what's your take on chuck hagel's confirmation? >> oh, we're going to do hagel first? okay. >> very tough, grueling day for senator hagel, but i have seen no shifting of votes from supporters. and i think the key question, joe, is is he qualified to be secretary of defense? >> is he qualified? >> and i believe he is. my vote will be for him because
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on issues like iran and israel, he indicated he is strongly in favor of unilateral sanctions against iran, and if necessary, military attack to prevent iran from becoming nuclear armed. on israel, strong support for israel's security. on sexual assault in the military, unequivocal, clear determination to go after it. on repeal of don't ask, don't tell, another very important issue, unequivocal support for implementing that repeal. on strategic issues, undersiege warfare, submarines, another very important source of surveillance as well as military options. unequivocal support as a cornerstone of our military future. i'll tell you what impressed me. both in his meetings with me privately and his public testimony yesterday, this man would be the first enlisted soldier to lead the department of defense, and the intensity
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and passion of his commitment to men and women in uniform at a time when we're downsizing, we need to keep the most able war fighters as well as leaders in our military and the transitioning of tens of thousands of active-duty men and women into civilian life where they're going to need the united states to keep faith with them. he has a credibility as a decorated combat veteran and someone who's given his life to public service. so on those issues as well as his personal story, i think he's qualified. >> mika? >> yeah, what did you make of the line of questioning? were there some areas that seemed to go into an unfair realm? >> you know, i said to senator hagel yesterday that quotes and votes matter. >> right. >> so questions about his past statements and actions are fair game, but i really regretted the lack of civility and respect for a man who has fought for the
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nation, been decorated for combat heroism and who is obviously a thoughtful and insightful person when it comes to many of these issues, and where he was willing to say he regretted and apologized for some of his statements which were, in fact, regrettable and unfortunate. >> gene, i tell you what. i'm not going to sit here, even though i like chuck hagel, i like his view on -- he's a realist. i hope he gets nominated. but at the same time, he didn't do well yesterday, nor did some republicans on that committee. i think joe manchin spoke for a lot of people that look at chuck hagel, an american hero, a man who served his country, proud for years, and he actually said he was embarrassed and apologized for the lack of civility. were you surprised by the degree of anger and vitriol that was spewed his way by a few of the republican members?
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>> well, i was surprised. i was surprised at some of the questioning from his -- from former colleagues and then from newer senators who i thought -- a couple of whom i think embarrassed themselves, frankly. the questioning -- the thing about the questioning, a lot of it was pretty irrelevant to what chuck hagel will actually do as defense secretary. just as a matter of public interest, i think there should have been more questioning about issues like sexual assault in the military. this culture, for example, that he can directly affect, that is the responsibility of the secretary of defense in a way that setting overall u.s. policy toward the middle east is not, for example. that's not going to be what he does, but he could have a big impact on internal issues in the pentagon. >> gillian? >> another huge issue which
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hasn't been discussed yet which is cybersecurity. because if you talk to people in the pentagon today, they're talking about the cyber world being the fourth area of combat right now. and in many ways, this is almost more scary than what's happening anywhere else. and yet we heard nothing about it yesterday. i'm sure as a senator, you must be aware of the degree of challenges posed by cybersecurities now from countries like china. >> i helped to lead an effort to do something more about cybersecurity in the last congress which was stymied, unfortunately, by opposition from some of the business groups. but absolutely right, a key cornerstone issue going ahead. also, the defense budget. which is absolutely critical. and i asked them questions about it. afghanistan. what should be the role of the united states? how should the mission be defined? what are the numbers we're going to leave behind? so on these issues where future defense policy will be shaped, more questions could have been asked. but even on afghanistan, he indicated he wanted to bring our
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troops back as quickly and safely as possible, leaving behind only a minimal force to do both training and the fight against al qaeda and the affiliate groups. so some of his stance came across. there might not have been the number of questions, but i took clear stands on those issues. >> you know, mike, it's interesting, the cybersecurity, a critical issue not brought up, drones, a critical issue, not brought up. and these attackers, these three, four, five republicans that were just really openly hostile to him, they weren't talking about matters of substance moving forward. >> no. >> one of them goes -- gets an old call-in show. >> yeah. >> you know, jane from topeka, you're on. >> first-time caller. >> first-time caller, longtime listen listener. again, a clown show. >> not only a clown show, but offensive to american taxpayers,
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american citizens and certainly to anyone with a member of their family in the military. because as i was watching, just through the eyes of an average viewer, you instantly, i think, became aware that this was personal. not political. that here you had on the stand a potential secretary of defense who is the least likely person in that room to send someone else's children to an unwanted, unnecessary and ridiculous war as we had in the war in iraq. so you had that. you had no questions about carrier groups in the pacific. you had no questions about the military budget, as you just referenced, senator. what is the military budget going to look like 0 ye30 yearsm now when someone 23 years of age is still going to be on disability and we owe them as a matter of policy and loyalty to be taking care of them. >> and here's a man who's given a good part of his adult life to caring for men and women who
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have worn the uniform. and he's seen more -- excellent point, as he put it -- from the bottom up. staff sergeant in the infantry, sergeant in the infantry, who has seen the consequences of war firsthand and from the ranks. and who has cared for the men and women who have served, and i think that will come across to people. >> gene, just real quick, isn't that the bottom line, though, some of these questions that we all want answers to. >> yeah. those are questions we all want answers to. the questions weren't asked. it was all personal, which was absolutely the wrong way to conduct that hearing. and so we don't have the answers. it was not a good performance by senator hagel. in the end, listening to senator blumenthal, it's not changing votes, so i think he will be the next secretary of defense. >> senator blumenthal, good to see you. gillian tett, thank you as well. gene, we'll be reading your column in "the washington post." still ahead, we'll have live
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coverage of the new jobs report as it breaks here and keep it right here on "morning joe." >> bradley cooper coming up, too. >> bradley's standing by. [ female announcer ] when a woman wears a pad she can't always move the way she wants. now you can. with stayfree ultra thins. flexible layers move with your body while thermocontrol wicks moisture away. keep moving. stayfree. you name it...i've hooked it. but there's one... one that's always eluded me. thought i had it in the blizzard of '93. ha! never even came close. sometimes, i actually think it's mocking me. [ engine revs ] what?! quattro!!!!! ♪
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welcome back. up next, actor bradley cooper is
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standing by. that's straight ahead on "morning joe." >> you're going to get the name of the movie right. >> it's "silver linings playbook." >> bradley, she got it right! >> good. it's a good movie. he can now put all that other stuff away. we'll be right back. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking
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the film is "silver linings playbook." this looks like it's really you. >> did you say it looks like it's really me? that's what my mother said. >> that's what i thought. >> he's bipolar. >> he's messed up. >> bradley, we all are. that's what's great. >> do me a favor, though. if you see it -- >> i'm going to see it. >> i'm going to come back on. let's have a conversation about it. >> you and jim going to go see it? >> exactly. okay. here to make good on his promise, the star of "silver linings playbook," the oscar nominated bradley cooper. good morning.
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>> good morning. welcome to my library. >> you look quite astute. why don't you get a pipe out. this is so good. i loved it. >> thank you for the support, mika. >> like you need it. you're getting such an incredible response, especially from the mental health community. so let's go right there. did you expect to get the response you're getting? >> you know, you stumble upon certain things in your life that you never expect. and for me, this was one from the beginning when i first played this character. and then the response that we got and the fact that i'm here in d.c. and we were at walter reed last night doing a q&a for about 200 war vets is just incredible. and we're able to raise awareness and try to destigmatize mental illness in this country. i mean, look at the cover of the "post," about how suicide rate has gone up with vets. >> that obviously is a huge issue in the veterans community, in the military community, but also across america. bipolar disorder, depression, mental health issues plague not just adults but children, very
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young children. and what your character, bradley, does in this movie is finds a way in a frank and funny way to sort of give people a sense of what mental illness looks like. you make us really uncomfortable at times, and you make us really hate your character at times. but in the end, we're all rooting for him, which is sort of how you feel about a loved one who is suffering from mental illness. >> and i think that's the key, mika, is that you're rooting for them. >> yeah. >> i had the blessing of being able to play this guy. and i think it actually destigmatized it for himself. and i can relate to pat solitano. and i think that's what this movie -- you know, unbeknownst to us making it, has done for those who suffer from this, that they're so -- i can't tell you how many times people at q&as have come up and say i can say i can relate to him. and before i would resist that for fear that people would treat me different. >> mm-hmm. >> hey, bradley, it's willie. the last time we talked to you, you were not yet oscar nominee
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bradley cooper, so congratulations. >> it's huge. >> you have changed. >> yeah, i've changed. i shaved. that's what i did. >> that was it. >> you brushed your hair back now. >> come on. >> you look like the mayor of san francisco now. >> no, stop. >> i'm trying to be a gentleman. >> he's going to take daniel day-lewis behind the wood shed and just drop him on oscar night. >> wow! okay. wow! he's going to do like the ice skating thing? tonya harding. >> i'm going to do a -- >> he's got a bumper sticker on the back of his hummer that says, "daniel day who?" >> the back of my hummer? >> yeah, neon pink hummer. don't tell anyone. >> daniel day who? willie, he has no respect. >> he's a classy guy. >> i like bradley. >> i bet bradley is really glad that he dropped by today. >> wow! i thought we were going to talk about -- >> it's donny deutsch.
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>> how's it going? >> i don't want to titillate the very devout gay audience, but i have a man crush on bradley. i've never said that before. i have to come clean on that. mika's very concerned -- >> you're making me uncomfortable. >> mika is very concerned that not only is there a "hang over 3" coming, but you've already signed on for "hangover 4" and "hangover 5." can you either verify that or denounce that? >> in one word, no. that is not true. >> darn. >> yeah. we finished it up. mika actually called warner brothers herself and put the kibosh on it. >> she spiked it. >> i blew up the deal. >> bradley, talk a little bit about last night going to walter reed. >> thank god, mike. geez. >> i was trying, bradley. i was trying. >> wow! >> i love this guy. i love this guy. >> last night -- it was incredible. you know, i was joined by former
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congressman patrick kennedy and dr. barbara dahlren whononprofi organization where experts give about an hour of their time to help those with mental illness and they logged about 70,000 hours last year and we did a "q" and "a" after they screened "silver linings playbook" and they thought 50 vets would come and their families and 200 showed up and just person after person talking about, you know, wanting to feel included and not. and, you know, getting a strategy for how to deal with whatever posttramatic stress disorder they have and, you know, there's a real need for awareness. and i'm just lucky that i stumbled upon this. and, you know, but this movie can actually have an effect if people take action and we live in a world where social media is so powerful that things can happen very fast, and it's just really about people taking action and putting -- shedding a light to the fact that this is something that needs to be addressed and spoken about so that people can feel more comfortable to come clean.
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and pat solitano is a guy in this movie who we watch -- we watch grow because he feels more comfortable. >> bradley, i did -- believe it or not, did have a question for you before. how has this role changed? and i'm not talking about your career. >> right. >> but given the attention you've gotten. you've kind of become a hero to people who are going through these kind of disorders, somebody who can put it out there in the public conscience. what do you do with it now? does it become a cause for you going forward? >> i mean, i can just know what i'm doing today for it. the fact that i'm here in d.c. and i was able to go to walter reed. i've never been there before. why have i never visited there before? there's no reason. so, i think i'm just sort of catching up on a lot of lost time perhaps. and it really is because i learned from this character that i played. there's something very interesting about walking into a room and having everybody go up back on their heels because they feel uncomfortable. and when i was pat for 33 days
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on set, i thought, oh, wow, this is an awful feeling and why is that? and i want to stop it. and so what i learned making this movie is something that i can impart and those who watch it who deal with the same thing can speak about. so, i'm just lucky that i got the opportunity to do this movie and then there's a platform to talk about it. >> yeah. no, i mean, it's the kind of movie, too, that you walk away and you keep thinking about it. and, i mean, it -- >> well, it's because it's so personal, mika. >> it is. >> david orussell set out to make a personal movie based on the relationship he has with his son and watching his son go through life and how to make it a little less difficult. >> yeah. >> and that's all. and then it became very personal for all of us. it was very personal for robert de niro and because of that, i think because it's all we cared about, that level of authenticity has permeated into those who are watching it and that's why i think that it's caused whatever benefit that it has to this issue. >> well, the reach is broad because there's some of your character in jennifer lawrence's character in all of us, too.
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so, you just walk out, everyone has a different feeling about it. also, i just -- you really caused a lot of trouble this week taking your shirt off at soul cycle. did you hear about this? women were going crazy. >> that's one of, like, three crazy stories this week, yeah. i didn't take -- >> what's the deal? >> they were screaming these women. >> it didn't happen. joe, joe, joe, it didn't happen, come on. >> sexiest man alive, you can't take off your shirt in front of women! >> joe, not only did i -- it said that i took my shirt off, imagine, the class ends, i take my shirt off, and then i walk around congratulating everybody on their job. >> by the way -- >> that's hot! >> i know soul cycle on the upper east side, he never would have gotten out of there. >> women would have torn him to shreds. >> first of all, who would do that? >> who would do that. >> actually, barnicle does it all the time. >> donnie does do that. >> so, bradley -- >> real quick, on the question of rumors, the lance armstrong
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movie, yes or no, bradley? >> no. i mean, nothing going on. >> a rumor. there you go. bradley, we want to thank you for being with us. >> no more "hangover." no more "wedding crashers." >> more importantly and i do mean this, personally there are people very close to me that have been deeply touched by your movie, and i know mika knows people. >> sure. >> everybody that has gone to see it. this is such an important movie and we thank you so much. >> thank you. >> for doing it and for coming here talking about it. >> thanks, guys, thanks for having me. >> great, great job. bradley cooper, thank you. "silver linings playbook" is now in theaters. go see it. it is worth it. you are watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back
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well, i said it. and i don't remember the context or when i said it. if i had an opportunity to edit that like many things i've said, i would like to go back and change the words and the meaning. i think in a larger context, i've said many, many things over many years. i have already stated that i regret the terminology. what i meant to say, should have said, it's recognizable. it's been recognized, is recognized, that the united nations.
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that's what i should have said, and thank you. good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up, everybody, as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set we have donny deutsch, richard haass and in washington, andrea mitchell. >> that was something. >> my last confirmation hearing i was told, the purpose of this hearing is not to show how smart you are. it's not to show how dumb they are, it's to get you confirmed and, you know, at the end of the day i'm not sure how many votes that changed. it's going to be increasingly a party line vote, but it was not a strong performance. it won't help him, and quite honestly, it will make his job being secretary of defense i think a little bit more difficult if and when he gets there. >> andrea, we like chuck hagel, and i think he'd be a good secretary of defense, but the performance yesterday was panned by people on all sides of the political spectrum. >> as claire mccaskill told me
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yesterday, she said, look, he is more used to asking questions than answering questions. there were a lot of issues. and what didn't help, of course, is that his former good friend, john mccain, just eviscerated him, grilled him. didn't give him a chance, you know, yes or no, give me an answer, were you correct or incorrect. i mean, there was a way to try to do that, but clearly he came with a very hostile attitude. and it was very painful to watch. >> yeah. it was awkward at times. >> i mean, john mccain, mika, didn't let him answer a question. i'm sorry, out of that exchange -- >> i thought it was rude. >> -- it was not chuck hagel who looked bad. >> ted cruz looked even worse. >> god! >> we're going to show all those coming up there -- >> he wasn't prepared, mika, in a lot of ways that were concerning. i think, again, democrats, republicans, independents alike, but -- but if the republican party thinks badgering an ill
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prepared witness that way is going to help them with middle america, they don't know middle america. they could have just let him talk around in circles. but it was, you know, you talk about the new senator from texas, john mccain, it's -- as joe manchion said, it was bad. >> whether they go badgering prepared or unprepared, badgering is not the way to go. >> having said that, the reviews are in. and they're pretty bad. >> horrible. >> senator marco -- i mean, some of them are partisan. but they're also a lot of op-eds we'll get to as well. the response to yesterday's hearing was not good. senator marco rubio said he cannot support hagel's confirmation. while senator lindsay graham said he's very reluctant to do so and wyoming senator john barrasso called hagel's performance weak and wobbly.
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>> john barrasso, mika, had concerns about chuck hagel before and, you know, i thought he was very respectful. i think the statement's respectful. guys like barrasso, john thune, you know, a lot of republicans would do very well to look at these leaders and emulate them. >> yeah. >> because those are the type of republicans that are very conservative, andrea mitchell, but can also be respectful. >> one of the things that was remarkable was that marco rubio put out his statement before the hearing actually got very far, so most people would wait until after the hearing is over. it was eight hours. that was painful. the kinds of unpreparedness and mistakes and i've been told from the highest levels that he'd been murder-boarded, you know, he'd practiced at the pentagon. he'd been working on this. but when he referred to containment on iran rather than prevention of nuclear weapons and had to be corrected and then corrected again.
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a note was passed to him and the chairman helpfully said to him, you know, containment is not a policy at all, that is not our policy. that is such a critical mistake on an issue that he knew he was going to be asked about. we knew he was going to have to explain the, quote, jewish lobby and take that back and some of the other things. so, the way he did it, didn't seem crisp. and then when ted cruz wheeled in the tv screen to play an al jazeera talk show and put him on the spot about how he defended israel or didn't defend israel, it would be like somebody saying to you, mika, joe, you were on c-span two years ago and what did you say to someone who called in. it was very, very tough. >> that was sort of my point at the top. >> it was interesting that you had said, mika, yesterday, as we were going to a meeting -- >> uh-huh. >> -- we went past hagel probably five minutes in. you just saw the picture of him on the screen. no sound. and you said, god, he looks
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awful. what's wrong with him? >> well, kind of looked like he'd been up all night. but i think, you know, again, the reviews kind of crystallize what his demeanor seemed like, which has nothing to do with his ability to do the job. but "the new york times" said he was disappointingly unsure of him, jennifer rubin from "the washington post" said hagel was sinking his own nomination and it was remarkably ill considered pick for secretary of defense and the most heated exchange of the day came from a former friend john mccain who grilled hagel on opposing the 2007 troop surge in iraq. take a look at that. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being -- >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward
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question. i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes-or-no answer on a lot of things. >> let the record show that the witness refused to answer the question. now, please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why i -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no, i think it's far more complicated than that, as i've already said. my answer is i'll defer that judgment to history. >> i think history has already made a judgment about the surge, sir, and you're on the wrong side of it. >> really, that actually went on much longer. >> it was awkward. >> and it was badgering and it sort of reminded me of when you see these stupid presidential debates and they go raise your hands, yes or no. i mean, it's just not that simple. >> yeah. you try to create a moment. i think chuck hagel's overarching theme was that the iraq war was a disaster. so, he didn't want to give
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credit for any part of it being a success including the surge. i thought it was noteworthy how little afghanistan was talked about, it's a hot war where we have 66,000 troops over there right now. not just that there weren't a lot of questions about it, but when he was asked about it, chuck hagel, he said i don't have enough information right now to make an decision to know how many troops would be when we leave in 2016. i thought it was strange. "a," it didn't come up and, "b," he didn't have a clear view of what we should do going forward in afghanistan. i don't know whether that's him being uninformed, unprepared or if he was being protective and not giving him anything to jump on. >> who prepared this guy? >> at the pentagon and some of it he did in preparation with john kerry. there was some joint murder boards. can i say one thing about the surge? the thing that john mccain was pressing him on. there's a big debate on that. yes, things got better. there was a big debate how much was to the surge as opposed of the payments from the cia to
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tribes in anbar province and chuck hagel was obviously saying, look, even if this thing made things better tactically, stra teeically it didn't make sense because the larger thrust of the war didn't make sense. you can understand why he was resisting answering it. we can argue whether it was the best way politically but substancively it was a impossible question to answer. >> donnie, he should have been more clear about why he wasn't answering it. >> it's easy to say, oh, a bad performance. that was serious what happened yesterday. there was a level of incompetency across the word, whether it was relation or demeanor or whether it was understanding facts and policy. i'm going to liken it as i said earlier to a job interview, if you go on a job interview like that and you perform, you don't get the job. i think we have to be very -- this is obviously such a critical, critical appointment and you have to look at that and say there are major concerns --
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>> should he not get the job, do you think? >> i would like to see a do-over on that. you can't not give him the job based on that but you also can't just dismiss it. those are very, very serious things that happened yesterday. >> andria, take a look at this, he was referring to a jewish lobby who he suggested intimidated people on capitol hill. >> do you still believe that their success in this town is because of intimidation? >> i regret referencing the jewish lobby. i should have said pro-israel lobby. that i should have used another term, and i'm sorry. and i regret it. the use of intimidation, i should have used influence. i think would have been more appropriate. >> name one person in your opinion who's intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> well, first -- >> name one.
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>> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> name one dumb thing we've been goaded into doing because of the pressure from the israeli or jewish lobby. >> i have already stated that i regret the termiology. >> but you said back then it makes us do dumb things. >> well, i can't give you an example. >> thank you. >> andrea mitchell, such a balancing act of a topic. what do you make of the questioning and the answers? >> well, first of all, i think, you know, remember when lloyd benson had had breakfast with some lobbyists and it was a big brouhaha when he was about to become treasury secretary and he said, when i make a mistake, it's a beaut, and it went away. you know, there's a way as donnie would be the first to tell you, there's a way to handle this kind of problem. i also i think if i'd been prepping him, i wouldn't have let him in his response refer to the, quote, jewish lobby,
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because that creates another sound bite. don't do that. just say, you know, i know that there's some controversy about what i said and, you know, never should have said that. let's move on. and then turn the corner, you know, to the fact that iran is now -- iran just in the last 24 hours announced that they are upgrading their centrifuges to produce more enriched uranium. turn it to that and say, but let's talk about the real issue, which is iran and the threat that iran poses and get, you know, on the record on that. >> i'm always struck, donny deutsch, in high-stakes hearings like this, when somebody falls on their face. in large part chuck hagel's situation here because he was ill prepared. how easy would it have been, i'll just say it, for you or me to sit down with him and say, listen, here's the deal, chuck, you've said a lot of really, really stupid things. you shoot from the hip a lot of times. you've said a lot of really, really dumb things. this is what we're going to say
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when you bring up another stupid thing, you quickly apologize and then you say thank goodness i'm not going to have to worry about that moving forward, but i'm going to have to worry about bigger things. i'll have to worry about iran. the fact that we have to stop them from getting nuclear weapons. i'm going to have to worry about afghanistan and answer these questions with the administration in consultation with the top generals and admirals. there's so many pat answers that you could give. say, listen, guys, i said a lot of really stupid things. and i know none of you as public figures have ever made any mistakes like that before, sort of joking about it, and then you move on. but he didn't do that. and part of the problem was -- >> he made it worse. >> -- it wasn't just substance. and he was weak on the substance on a lot of weapons systems. he made it worse, because they did not prepare him. >> to deflect. >> listen, he had so many unfortunate statements that he said in the past and they knew that going on. why didn't they handle this
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better? >> there's a simple strategy called respond and pivot and there's a half a dozen real stupid things he said in the past and we all have. so, you can always say, hey, look, it was ten years ago and i've learned since then. >> yeah. a couple of other news stories we have going on this morning, at 8:30 we'll be covering it live, the labor department will release its first jobs report of the year which is expected to show the economy largely unchanged from the last month of 2012. unemployment rates still at 7.8%. >> and we're going to hear -- the president's jobs council -- >> exactly. >> -- will weigh in. >> i was just getting to that. >> this report is critical. you need a jobs chown si s coun. >> fine. they're getting rid of it. >> a lot of times i'm critical of this administration, but i think putting together jobs -- willie, what did i say, the jobs council thing, he's got to do it right. this is going to be big. >> they're all going to be on today in their robes they're going to come on and break down the numbers.
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>> new initiatives and collaborations with businesses are going to be announced soon. >> the job council is? >> no, that's going away. they're getting rid of it. >> what? >> they wear helmets, the job council. >> stop it! >> you mean the guys on the job councils lost their jobs? >> yeah. >> this has not turned out how i expected. oh, my lord. the monthly jobs report is due out just a few minutes from now. here with us to break down the numbers "fortune" magazine's lee gallagher, "the washington post's" ezra klein and cnbc's brian sullivan. and the mo jo month in debut. but, first, bill karins with a check on the forecast, bill? >> i'm guessing i probably didn't make that list. let's talk about what will happen this weekend. we head into february on a cold note in many spots. we're going to get some snow this weekend, too. this morning you woke up to some moderate snow.
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a little worse than we expected. it's still snowing hard over coastal areas of maryland and delaware and southern new jersey around atlantic city will pick up a fluffy 2 to 3 inches this morning. that will be gone by the noon hour. talk about cold, frigid air. look at the windchill from chicago all through iowa, minneapolis, st. paul, milwaukee, green bay. the leader of the group? duluth, minnesota, with a negative 41 windchill this morning. i can't even imagine. the forecast this weekend, we're going to stay warm in the west, we're going to stay very cold in the great lakes and we'll have a couple chances at some snow diving down from the north right through the mid-atlantic. so, today we get rid of that snow. rest of the country looks just fine. no problems at all. on saturday the next chance of snow comes down through the dakotas. just a little light coating there possible, iowa, minnesota, and chicago. saturday night that will go through kentucky and the ohio valley. and then on sunday, super bowl sunday, this little weak storm will make its way through the east coast. it is possible to see a couple inches of snow from new york
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city northwards up to new england. at this point it does not look like a blockbuster storm, but if you are traveling to your super bowl parties or destinations, you may have to drive in some of the white stuff. just like our friends in d.c. this morning. you can see the coating on the ground. you are watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 this morning, i'm going to trade in hong kong.
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ronaiah tuiasosopo. >> tuiasosopo.
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>> tuiasosoronaiah tuiasosopo. >> tuiasosopo. >> ronaiah tuiasosopo. >> tuiasosopo. >> tuiasosopo. >> tuiasosopo. >> tuiasosopo. >> sources say dr. phil and -- what's his name. >> hilarious. okay. welcome back to "morning joe." live look at rockefeller plaza, the ice skating rink. joining us now "fortune" magazine's assistant managing editor lee gallagher and in washington columnist for "the washington post" and msnbc policy analyst ezra klein. good to have you both on hour show this hour. someone else is here, too. >> that's right, andrea's here. >> andrea is here. this is a big day. >> i never met him.
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>> you're going to. >> what do we have going on here, mika? >> i have absolutely no idea. >> oh, just stop. >> no, we've got the jobs numbers coming up in about seven minutes. i guess give us an expect of what we can expect. joe pointed out at the top of the show that the jobs council -- >> lost their jobs. >> there's an irony to that. >> irony, subtext, yes. >> i don't think we're the ones that are most worried about losing their own jobs but, you know, it was a pretty significant, you know, if not -- it was an ironic piece of news. it was worthy of note. >> yes. >> the jobs number, let's hope it's not as big a surprise as the gdp number was yesterday. most expectations are that this is going to be a relatively expected number that we're going to see. you know, last month the number came in at about 155,000. most experts called for anywhere from 165,000 to anywhere up to 200,000. so, you know, we're expecting a modest increase which is kind of in line with what we've been
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seeing, you know, for the past three months. >> the gdp number really shocked people, the first time in three years going backwards. what does it mean to everybody? >> it was a huge surprise. nobody was expecting that. if you need any proof that fiscal tightening has an immediate impact, there it is. that said, the consensus is don't worry about it too much because the drop in military spending, which was a 40-year low, it was significant, it outweighed a lot of other positives. for example, residential spending was up and business spending was up 12% which is a continuation of a story we've been seeing the past three years. the business productivity stories. >> ezra, it's hard to get really our arms around this economy, where exactly it is, what it's doing. you look at wall street, and things have never been better. >> it's nice for them. >> over the past four or five years, real incomes gone down. when you saw that number and looked -- dug into it a little bit deeper, what did you get from it?
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>> when i saw the gdp number you got a couple things, right? one, fiscal tightening does matter. that was very, very clear. we had a drop that we would have grown by 1.23 percentage points on an analized rate if we'd just been neutral in government spending and investment. but one thing that i think is always important to say with these numbers, that numbers is going to get revised very significantly. to give you the most extreme example back in democrats of 2008 when the recession was beginning our initial number said the economy shrunk by 3.5 percentage points analized rate. it had actually gone by almost 9. i wouldn't be surprised if you see a significant upwards revision. the initial jobs number it will be off on average by 100,000 jobs, to give you an example of how that can work in our coverage of it. a couple years ago in august when the jobs number came out at zero. not one job. two months later it got revised up to 100,000, and that would
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have looked a lot better. that was a correct number. i tend to look more closely at the internals and it's true the internals weren't that bad particularly in the private sector where you're seeing fairly strong consumer spending, where you're seeing fairly strong business investment and so the economy is kind of doing what it's been doing for some time, which is chugging alog, the private sector is fairly healthy. the labor market is in a weak recovery and government direct spending and investment is contracting as it has been since 2010. >> and, lee, the question is, does the economy continue to chug along even slowly upward if we pull back on federal spending? >> i think the answer there, i think that is -- yesterday thoughed that that might be the one thing that could derail our recovery. we were chugging along if you look at auto sales and housing and m & a activity was going up. it was surprising and it was something that hasn't happened
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in a long time, the cut in military spending. it could derail things and i think going forward if we see more, this will be the one thing that will sort of shroud the market and particularly main street in much more pessimism and that's what we don't need right now. >> not the capital markets. >> not the capital markets, they're going like gangbusters. >> ezra and lee stay with us. we'll bring you the numbers live. cnbc's brian sullivan joins us with the jobs number due out moments from now. "morning joe" will be right back. living with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis
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the jobs report has just crossed. it's -- ezra klein, right on the numbers, man, 157,000, right? >> yeah. you got it. the expectations were right. i think it was 165,000, given the error on this, i think it's exactly on. unemployment up one percentage point to 7.9, although that kind of thing bounces around a little bit. this is exactly what people thought, a kinded of midd ed ki continuing. >> break it down for us, brian. >> breaket down, buddy, what are you seeing? >> i'm going to go back a month and look at december while ezra
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nailed it the number was in line with expectations, maybe a couple thousand light but not enough to make a difference. december was revised higher by more than 40,000. december came in at 155,000. they revised it to 196,000 jobs gained. >> wow. >> yeah, it's one of the biggest revisions that i've seen in a long, long time. so, a big revision up for december. we got to dig in a little bit to figure out the reasons, the bls website, i'm going through the release a couple pages long now. so, really, january about in line. maybe a tad light. the 7.9% unemployment rate, right, this is where it's confusing and ezra said, listen, it bounces around. and he's right. here's why. an upward tick in unemployment is not a bad thing because it means more people may be looking for a job. you're only counted in this number if you are actively seeking employment. as more people drop out of the workforce, they give up even trying, we could actually see unemployment tick down because they've given up. so, sometimes before unemployment really goes down permanently, you see an uptick
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as people say, hey, things are better. i'm going to try to get a job again. and, therefore, that number often will tick up slightly before it rolls over. let's hope that's the case, guys. >> so, lee, if you take this month in line with expectations, last month, a big revision upward. pretty darn good. >> it's pretty good. i just hope that the world will see it that way. what brian just explained is absolutely true, but sometimes the optics are what trumpsving, so then the rate went up. on top of top of what happened yesterday and the pessimism with the consumer, we saw consumer confidence numbers drop a lot in january. >> i wondered if you would mention this. >> i don't want to be too pessimistic. the national retail federation came down with its 2013 spending and it's down. >> that's a big problem. >> things -- you know, the market -- not the market, the kind of, you know, consumer recovery is starting to impact what's really happening which is we are a tale of two mark pets right now in a big way.
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and that points out to something in the job market and the labor market. >> guys. >> brian, jump in. >> what we talked about looks to be accurate, because there were 804,000 so-called discouraged workers in january. those are people that are basically not looking for work because they just don't think jobs are out there. that number was a drop of 255,000 from january of last year. so, it's year over year, but the number of people that are discouraged and think they can't find a job has decreased significantly year over year, meaning, they may try now to go back into the workforce which would explain the slight uptick in the unemployment rate. >> ezra, that's good news. talk to leigh's point, though, about consumer confidence, what's your take on where consumers are and how that's going to drive the recovery moving forward? >> consumer confidence kind of it's tough to establish, i guess, to use an annoying word, causality, right? consumer confidence will go down
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if the economy's worse, it will go up. if we get a couple of good jobs reports and people are hiring, consumer confidence goes up. it's not independent, though, of course, it does have its own effect and people are concerned. i want to add one more things to this job report. brian correctly mentioned the december jobs revision and it's really important, these revisions frankly matter more than the number for this month because they're just a lot more accurate. and the december revision is up 40,000. the november revision, i want to get the numbers right, because they're kind of shocking. the november revision is up from 161,000 to 247,000. >> wow. >> it's gone up almost 100,000. now, one thing to be said about this jobs report, this is an annual rebenchmarking, they are looking back at the jobs report and getting their models to fit the way the actual economy, the way the actual labor market looks and they should be significantly more accurate. that's a huge revision. the jobs report, the headline isn't the 157,000 jobs for this month it's that we've added a couple hundred thousand or more
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than a couple hundred jobs in revisions over the last two months. it's huge. >> it is. >> brian sullivan, ezra klein, thank you very much. leigh, stay with us following this. from "town & country" magazine looks at the inside world of prince harry. keep it here on "morning joe." ♪ [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ]
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here with us now editor of "town & country" jay fielding, he's studying up, because he's got the new issue. you've got it all right here. >> he hasn't read it yet. >> yeah. >> but he says it looks good. >> there's interesting things in it. i realize some mice have been up to some very good work. >> i'm studying up, i will tell you. >> okay. leigh gallagher has got it all under control. >> i'm studying this. >> good, good, yes. >> where would you like to start? >> i don't know where to begin. this is the top 50 bachelors, but different age groups. you've got some aging, you know, elder statesmen on the list and you've included george clooney on that who is, i'll say, one of my favorite, as is bradley cooper, i'll say, but he's not on here, is he? >> that's true. he is not. i think we were looking for, you know, to be a bit surprising to find a group that you wouldn't expect. eclectic, you know, through the "town & country" lens, so
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looking at anything from billionaires to hollywood scions. >> give us some names. >> clint eastwood's who looks just like he did back in "datety har dirty harry" movies, and sawyer avery, three kennedys, conner, the one in the news the most but a couple of others who are interesting guys. sarkozy's son who is a deejay. watch out. >> you have political people. reggie lowe. >> that's fun. >> and john favro. >> obama's speechwriter who's a handsome smart dude. >> you got tim tebow on the list! >> tebow has no home right now, so maybe he can find a different kind.
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>> do you know what's nice about this magazine, unlike others that we have on the show -- "gq" -- people are dressed. >> never heard of it. >> and nicely. >> well, thank you very much. there's no "g" strings in there either. >> no. huh-uh. >> no. >> except on the guys. >> he does have an article about the sexiest island on earth. maybe you could tell us, what is the sexiest island on earth. >> what would your guess be, joe? >> well, donny deutsch would say it's st. parts. >> yeah. >> mystique? >> no. it's capri. >> capri. >> ah, there you go. >> by far the sexiest. speaking of people who know how to dress well, if you go to capri, you're in the midst of it. >> talk about it. >> so, we did a piece. it's a fashion shoot that's also half travel, so, you know, we went there. we did an amazing shoot. went to the beautiful restaurants, the old world shoe makers. that made the sandals for jackie kennedy and, yeah, the beach clubs.
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>> beautiful. >> it's, you know, a fantasyland that comes to life especially for the italians in august. and, you know, if you haven't been there, you got to find a way to go. >> have you been there? >> i have. i have. >> can i ask you a question? >> please. >> where have you been to more, capri or sattaten island? >> we know the answer to that, just look at him. >> how about manhattan island? >> our manhattan island. some other pictures. where do you like to stay if you go there? >> just to say the quistanap? >> i scant pronounce it but i can stay there. let's talk about the guy on the cover. prince harry. >> what did we learn about him that we don't already know? >> there's always something to learn about. he went on a 15-hour bender is maybe what we call it. >> really? >> yeah. he's on leave for four or five weeks and it's understandable and he's coming back from a pretty intense tour of duty as we know where he actually got
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behind his rifle and, you know, went to war. so, i think, you know, this guy's just -- seems to be one that as crazy as he gets sometimes, he's still the closest to everyone's heart i think in terms of being a royal who takes his job seriously but seems human and likes to have a good time and who can't like that? >> so, how do we know this isn't sort of a pr push after the whole naked thing? >> well, if that were the case, we would have had the ability to shoot him, photograph him, that is. so, you know, he doesn't do that very often. we're hoping one day he will, but, yeah. >> to what degree do you think does the royal family try to kind of manage or contain him? he obviously likes to have fun. he does his own thing. how much is he kind of held back by that or is he just kind of given -- >> i'm sure they do everything they can, but he seems pretty wily. that's a very tight group that
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looks after everything that goes on there. but we've been living on the -- off this in the news for years, right? somebody always slips through the cracks and gets -- gets -- you know, does something silly or ridiculous. and, you know, i think the things that he does really seem quite like most young men of his age. >> what was your take -- your main takeaway from the article, what your reporters figured out? or mice as you called them. >> that he's -- he's a guy who's going to be, you know, in a part of our lives for a long time, and i think even though he's not going to have much chance of sitting -- wearing the crown so to speak, he's going to be somebody who helps transform the idea of the royal family in the years to come and is one who can really connect with the population and, you know, be somebody that is human and you can relate to. >> yeah. one final question on the top 50 bachelors.
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the winklevoss twins, really? >> a number of guys come with disclaimers. >> what man doesn't come with a disclaimer, come on? >> fair enough. >> let's just end it there. >> some occupations are suing people, so that said, you got to be careful. we get to talk about diplomats. >> what are you doing, honey? >> i'm going to sue somebody else. no, i'm saying if you have a winklevoss around your household. what about diplomats? >> well, you know, let's talk about people who have jobs who are looking for bigger jobs, right? so, you know, the diplomat thing. the plum jobs, the plum clubs, it seems if you want the word ambassador in front of your name, there are two different categories. there's the guys who actually have to get danger pay and go into afghanistan and then there's the socially intense jobs in london and paris. and this horse race that's going on right now we're watching.
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>> i want the latter. >> no doubt. >> it's nicer. >> and i can fly back and forth. fantastic. >> all right. the new february issue of "town & country" as my mother to say with the cover story of the top 50 bachelors is on the newsstands now. thank you. >> thank you. from grabby polar bears to the trip to the dubliner, the month in review straight ahead. and beyonce tries to quiet her critics with an impromptu performance. we'll be right back. >> look at that bear. the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone but her likes 50% more cash, but i have an idea. do you want a princess dress? yes. cupcakes? yes. do you want an etch-a-sketch? yes! do you want 50% more cash? no. you got talent. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn.
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incapable of doing, making something pass out of the senate that actually counts. we just keep getting deeper and deeper in debt. it's the most disappointing thing in my life. >> what's going on in washington? nothing. >> the whole idea of putting political capital together is to spend it down. >> you are about as cynical as i am about what's going on in washington, d.c.? you really don't think they're capable of doing two things at once. >> not these people. >> how does it look to the average person? it's almost like the government is in permanent divorce court. ♪ >> would you consider possibly being future senator barney frank? >> oh. >> i told the governor that i would not like frankly to do that. >> i spent a career carrying m-16 or m-4 carbine, i personally don't think there's any need for that kind of weaponry on the streets. >> problem solver, committed to
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fix, not fight. >> not fight. >> it's all attitude, man. it's all attitude. ♪ >> i said see you at thanksgiving dinner, my dad e-mailed me, he was worried you were coming. >> i actually contemplated coming. ♪ >> i love your show. i watch it every morning. >> and you watch for mika. >> i'm happy to meet you. >> not really. >> don't get me wrong. >> good job on way too early, bill. >> not bad, right? >> very nice. you're coming along just fine. >> what part of me did you like the best? >> oh, good god. >> i know which part. >> oh, my lord! >> i'm joking, pat. i love you. >> thanks for coming on. >> i love you, too, joe.
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>> now she's naked on the cover of "gq." >> she's not naked. >> no. >> next year. >> yeah. okay. that's quite a month. >> what we learned today. >> leigh, what did you learn? >> i learned there's a lot of good in the job numbers specifically the decline in the long-term unemployment, i think it's a great thing and i also heard about the sad passing of a real new yorker in ed koch. >> what did you learn? >> i learned andrew is here. he's taking my version of what we learned today. tell us about your dad, andrew. >> we're on tv. don't say a word. >> it's good to have you here. >> tall. >> i learned he's a tall guy. sort of got the prince harry thing going. >> a look-alike, nice. >> he dressed well. >> happy belated birthday, my man. all right, very good. mika, if it's way too early, what time is it? >> it's time for "morning joe," but now it's time for "the dai rundown" with chuck todd. have a great weekend, ev